B.A. in Education with a Specialization in Early Childhood Education (2023)

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B.A. in Education with a Specialization in Early Childhood Education

Education

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Overview

Bobbi Jo Kite Herbold, BA Program Coordinator
Fowler Hall, Room 301D

Courses & Requirements

Summary of Requirements

2022-2023
Core Curriculum 43
Pre-Major Courses 9
Major and Related Courses 71
Free Elective Courses 3
TOTAL 126

Requirements for a Major in Early Childhood Education

For continuation in a teacher education program, an education major must maintain a cumulative degree average of 2.75 or better, with a B or higher in education courses and a C+ or better in all pre-major, pre-professional and related elective courses.

Required pre-major courses 9 hours

To be taken in freshman or sophomore year:

An overview and study of contemporary trends, problems, and issues in general education in terms of educational philosophies, types of educational programs, the relation of education to the individual and society, and curriculum and instruction. Some consideration of the relevance of regular education to special education and education of deaf and hard of hearing students. Discussion of organizations and agencies related to education.

An introduction to the major features of languages and to the structure, use, and variation in the sign languages and sign systems commonly used in the United States. The course will cover four major topics: (1) Language: The nature and definition of languages, the uniqueness of language, and contrasts between language and other forms of communication; (2) Language and Culture: The role of language in human society, with special focus on language acquisition, language identity, and bilingualism; (3) American Sign Language Structure: A survey of the major features of the linguistic structure of ASL. Topics are: Phonology: the structure of the physical signals; Morphology: the basic structure and composition of meaningful units of ASL; Syntax: word order and nonmanual syntactic signals in ASL sentences; (4) Language Variation: Language variation and language contact in the deaf community, including discussions of contact varieties of signing and systems for representing English.

An introduction to the scientific study of human behavior, providing an overview of the major issues, methods, and contributions of psychology. Content areas include development, language, learning, cognition, physiological psychology intelligence, and abnormal and social psychology.

Required major and related courses 62 hours

Pre-professional Component

This course is designed to provide students with a foundational understanding of the theories, research and literature in the area of language and literacy acquisition and learning. Students will examine their own beliefs and processes related to language and literacy acquisition and learning. This course will prepare students for subsequent courses that address literacy teaching and learning in the classroom and the home courses.

The focus of this course is on the interactions between young learners and the physical and social environments encountered in parent-infant programs, preschool, kindergarten, and primary settings. Students will learn how to organize, plan, create, and modify environments for optimal learning. 40 clock hours of related practicum experience are required.

The course addresses the application of psychological principles to the educational setting. Topics include learning theory, cognition and memory, individualized instruction, human development, intelligence, creativity, exceptionality, motivation, discipline, and measurement and evaluation.

This course is the first part of a two-semester course sequence with MAT 172. This course is designed for prospective early childhood and elementary school teachers. The contents of this course include concepts and theories underlying early childhood and elementary school mathematics. The students will explore the ''why'' behind the mathematical concepts, ideas, and procedures. Topics include problem solving, whole numbers and numeration, whole numbers operations and properties, number theory, fractions, decimals, ratio and proportion, and integers.

This course is the second part of a two-semester course sequence with MAT 171. This course is designed for prospective early childhood and elementary school teachers. The contents of this course include concepts and theories underlying early childhood and elementary school mathematics. The students will explore the ''why'' behind the mathematical concepts, ideas and procedures. Topics include rational and real numbers, introduction to algebra, Euclidean and solid geometry, statistics, and probability.

This course examines physical, emotional, social, cognitive, and language development from conception to the end of childhood. We will analyze the complexity of factors that contribute to developmental outcomes, including transactions between genetic and environmental factors. Developmental theory and research evidence will be used to address the well-being of children in the US and around the globe, with specific attention to inequities related to race, class, language, and culture.

(Video) Bachelor of Education in Early Childhood Education and Special Education Admissions Talk 2019

Professional Component

EDU 600: optional – may count as free elective hours

In this course, the Undergraduate Education program students spend at least 36 hours serving and aiding teachers in a public school program. This course will address integrating content (Language Arts and Social Studies) and require students to apply what is learned in the previous coursework to practicum situations in school sites. Regular group seminars are held to discuss, analyze, and reflect on educational topics related to teaching. This course prepares students for a subsequent student teaching experience.

This course will familiarize students with the nature and importance of curriculum in education from K-12. The course also provides an initial experience in integrated curriculum planning that incorporates the use of current technologies. Current theories of assessment, curriculum, instruction and learning across diverse educational settings are applied in classroom laboratory settings. Content assessments and evaluation in the candidate area(s) of study are emphasized. Field experience in a school setting is a required part of this course.

This course provides an introduction to the field of early childhood education. The course will include the study of the foundations of early childhood education including: theories, models, evidence-based practices, issues and developmentally appropriate practice. In addition, the course will address the role of the teacher, families, and other professionals in supporting young children (ages 3-8).

This course for teacher candidates specializing in early childhood provides an integration of literacy theory and research, content-based instructional practices, and assessment and evaluation cycles for diverse learners including ASL-English bilingual learners, English language learners (ELL), struggling readers and writers, and students with disabilities. In this course, candidates explore in depth an integrated approach to the study of early childhood literacy, curriculum building, methods and materials for literacy instruction, including language development, reading and writing.

This course emphasizes developmental learning environments, materials, and experiences for teaching young children, birth through preschool. Focus will be on curriculum based in home-school interactions, as well as the integration of language arts, reading, science, social studies, mathematics, and creative expression. 20 hours of related field experience required.

This course emphasizes developmental learning environments, materials, and experiences for teaching young children, 6 to 8 years of age. Focus will be on curriculum based in home-school interactions, as well as the integration of all subject areas (social studies, mathematics, language arts, reading, arts, science, and physical education). 30 hours of related field experience is required.

This course is the final professional experience in the early childhood education program and is a required field experience in a school classroom for a period of ten weeks under the supervision of the classroom teacher (cooperating teacher) and a University Supervisor. During the course, the candidate will take responsibility for planning, teaching, and evaluating all aspects of the classroom program. Candidates co-register for and attend a required weekly seminar held weekly on campus for purposes of common problems and/or concerns, and exchange of useful teaching experiences.

Students will learn about the current curriculum, content, materials, and methodologies utilized by educators in the elementary school mathematics curriculum. Students will explore methodological principles and apply them by developing lesson plans, a mathematics portfolio, activities, and projects. Observation, laboratory activities and participation in a field experience are included in the course. Students will learn mathematics by doing mathematics using Childhood Education International (ACEI) & Elementary Education Standards and Supporting (EESS).

(Video) Reflection on Moreland University's Early Childhood Education Specialization Master's Degree

An in-depth study of children's literature primarily for early childhood and secondary education majors. Focuses on the evaluation, selection, and sharing of children's and young adult books in instructional settings. Participants will read, respond to, and evaluate picture books and chapter books of various genres. Emphasizes the identification and teaching of literary elements in context, strategies for sharing books with children, and the importance of using authentic children's and young's adult literature in schools.

This course is designed to familiarize students with the identification of exceptional children in terms of developmental needs, interpretation of assessment data, development and evaluation of appropriate intervention strategies for the regular classroom teacher, and legislation in special education. This course will prepare teacher candidates to work with children and youth with a broad range of disabilities and educational needs. Topics will include understanding disability; understanding principles of legislation and curriculum and instruction; establishing positive learning environments; and working collaboratively.

The student teaching seminar is a capstone course in which student teachers in the Undergraduate Education Program meet regularly as a group to discuss, analyze, reflect upon and resolve classroom issues that occur during their full-time internship experiences with hearing students. This course is designed to be taken in tandem with Student Teaching. Students will be participating in student teaching at various clinical sites every weekday for 10 weeks. Educational topics related to assessment, classroom management, certification, portfolio development, and related areas are covered in depth.

Related elective courses 9 hours

Choose 3 hours from each of the following areas for a total of 9 hours, in consultation with departmental advisors:

Creativity

An introduction to clay as an artistic medium. A variety of pots will be constructed using the following hand-building techniques: pinch, coil, slab, and compression. Three-dimensional design principles will be emphasized.

This course focuses on methodology and practice of educational drama applied to multidisciplinary learning within the first through sixth grade curricula. Students will be introduced to theme and story based improvisation, story dramatization, role play, and teacher-in-role strategies, and learn how to adapt activities for children with special needs. Curricular areas include language arts, social studies, science, and math, with additional focus on examining emotional development, and creativity. Current trends in assessment of drama will also be explored. Resources will include multiethnic themes, stories, and folklore.

Health and Wellness

This course will cover teaching and leading theories and techniques necessary for planning and delivering physical activities and wellness programs that foster health enhancing active participation, within a comprehensive school environment. Emphasis is given to the principles of motor development; assessment techniques; and the psychomotor, cognitive, psychological, and social developmental needs of children of various ages, diversity, and abilities. Also included is an overview of the many education, community, and government organizations that provide and advocate for health enhancing physical activity participation.

The course includes scientific principles, and teaching methodology necessary for the modification of physical education programs, sport, or recreational activities to meet the developmental needs and capabilities of students with diverse abilities. Emphasis is given to the principles of motor development; assessment techniques; developmental needs; psychomotor, cognitive, psychological, and social characteristics of individuals with various disabilities; legal requirements; resources for participation in community sport and recreation programs; and developing appropriate instructional and behavioral strategies for an inclusive or adapted activity learning environment.

Diversity/Social Justice

This course examines various forms of oppression by looking across different cultures and communities, then examines possible parallels occurring within the deaf community.

This course will introduce students to the field of Disability Studies. As an emerging interdisciplinary field of study, Disability Studies does not approach disability as a ''medical condition, but as a human condition'' (Charlton). Instead of studying the causes and rehabilitation of persons with disabilities, we will explore the historical, social, political, religious, philosophical, and cultural influences that ''construct'' the category of ''disability.'' We will also examine how persons with disabilities construct their own meanings and identities.

The diverse beliefs of nations and classes, world divisions, and the racial rivalry reflected in various systems of law and politics all give changing meaning to such phrases as human rights and fundamental freedoms. This course will look at these rights and freedoms within the different belief systems, world divisions, and racial rivalries. Special attention will be given to the deaf communities in United States and their struggle to achieve full human rights and freedom.

This course provides students an opportunity for examination of personal attitudes, stereotypes, biases, and misconceptions that affect ethnic-competent professional practice. Attention is given to increasing students' knowledge, understanding, appreciation, and sensitivity to diversity, oppression, and racism, and the implications of each for social work and other human services. While the course addresses the cognitive and conceptual aspects of learning, primary emphasis is on the affective process. In addition to learning about racism, discrimination, power/powerlessness, and ethnocentrism, students participate in experiential groups and role play. These exercises provide opportunities to explore new ways of thinking, feeling, and responding to people who experience discrimination or oppression because of their race, ethnic background, gender, age, disability, or sexual orientation, or because they are deaf or hard of hearing.

Students will complete field experiences in conjunction with the courses below. These field experience hours do not count in the summary of requirements for the specialization. Students will be required to pay a fee for suitability background checks prior to their initial field experiences in the program. The courses with field experiences include:

Required

EDU 320, EDU 609, and EDU 624: 20 clock hours

(Video) Specialisation on Early Childhood Learning Video 1 EDU4301

EDU 621, EDU 622 and EDU 626: 30 clock hours

The focus of this course is on the interactions between young learners and the physical and social environments encountered in parent-infant programs, preschool, kindergarten, and primary settings. Students will learn how to organize, plan, create, and modify environments for optimal learning. 40 clock hours of related practicum experience are required.

This course for teacher candidates specializing in early childhood provides an integration of literacy theory and research, content-based instructional practices, and assessment and evaluation cycles for diverse learners including ASL-English bilingual learners, English language learners (ELL), struggling readers and writers, and students with disabilities. In this course, candidates explore in depth an integrated approach to the study of early childhood literacy, curriculum building, methods and materials for literacy instruction, including language development, reading and writing.

This course emphasizes developmental learning environments, materials, and experiences for teaching young children, birth through preschool. Focus will be on curriculum based in home-school interactions, as well as the integration of language arts, reading, science, social studies, mathematics, and creative expression. 20 hours of related field experience required.

This course emphasizes developmental learning environments, materials, and experiences for teaching young children, 6 to 8 years of age. Focus will be on curriculum based in home-school interactions, as well as the integration of all subject areas (social studies, mathematics, language arts, reading, arts, science, and physical education). 30 hours of related field experience is required.

Program Outcomes

Based on the Council of Exceptional Children (CEC) Standards and Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) Principles

Standard 1: Learner Development:The teacher candidate understands how learners grow and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and values the perspectives of the child, their family, and the community.

Standard 2: Learning Differences:The teacher candidate uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures, languages, and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that are developmentally appropriate and provide challenging learning experiences for each and every learner to achieve their highest potential.

Standard 3: Learning Environments:The teacher candidate works independently and with others to create environments that support individual and group learning, and that encourage positive social interaction, active engagement, and self-motivation.

Standard 4: Content Knowledge:The teacher candidate understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the disciplines he or she teaches and creates learning experiences that make these aspects of the discipline accessible and meaningful for each and every learner.

Standard 5: Application of Content:The teacher candidate understands how to connect concepts and use differing perspectives to engage learners in critical thinking, creativity, evaluation, and collaborative problem solving related to authentic local and global issues.

Standard 6: Assessment:The teacher understands and uses multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their own growth, monitor learner progress, and guide the teacher's and learner's decision-making.

Standard 7: Planning for Instruction:The teacher candidate plans instruction that supports each and every student in meeting rigorous learning goals by drawing upon knowledge of content areas curriculum, cross-disciplinary skills, and pedagogy as well as knowledge of learners and the community context.

Standard 8: Instructional Strategies:The teacher candidate uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage learners to develop a deep understanding of content areas and their connections, and the critical thinking and problem-solving skills needed to apply knowledge in meaningful ways.

Standard 9: Reflection, Professional Learning, and Ethical Practice:The teacher candidate engages in ongoing reflection and professional learning and uses evidence to evaluate practice, particularly the effects of the teacher candidate's choices and actions on others (learners, families, other professionals, and the community, and adapts practice to meet the needs of the learner.

Standard 10: Leadership, Advocacy, and Collaboration:The teacher candidate seeks appropriate advocacy and leadership roles and opportunities to take responsibility for student learning to collaborate with learners, families, colleagues, other school professionals, and community members to ensure learner growth.

Standard 11: Technology:The teacher candidate uses knowledge of effective multimedia communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and accessibility to support interaction in the classroom.

Standard 12: Literacy and Numeracy:The teacher candidate applies a variety of instructional strategies to develop and enhance the literacy and numeracy skills of each and every learner including the use of multiple representations and explanations to present ideas and concepts.

Accreditation

Gallaudet University is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE) and recognized by the U.S. Department of Education as a Title IV approved institution. The Gallaudet University B.A. Education: Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, or Secondary Education program is accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Preparation (CAEP) organization. The program is also approved by the District of Columbia State Education Agency (SEA) and licensed by the National Association of State Directors of Teacher Education and Certification (NASDTEC). In compliance with the U.S. Department of Education and the District of Columbia Higher Education Licensure Commission (HELC) requirements for participation in the National Council for State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement (NC-SARA), Gallaudet University provides information pertaining to this program and teacher educator licensure within each of the U.S. states and territories. This program is designed to meet the educational requirements for teacher educator licensure in the District of Columbia. If your intent is to secure licensure outside of Washington, D.C., then BEFORE beginning Gallaudet University's program, use the drop-down list below and select the state or territory in which licensure is intended. This will help you determine whether Gallaudet has obtained confirmation from the state or territory to formally identify whether the Gallaudet B.A. Education: Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, or Secondary Education program meets, does not meet or cannot be confirmed as meeting the educational requirements for licensure.

Support

LIcensure Disclosure: B.A. in Education – Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, or Secondary Education

Gallaudet's Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, or Secondary Education program is designed to meet the educational requirements for teacher educator licensure in the District of Columbia. It is accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation, approved by the District of Columbia Office of the State Superintendent of Education, and licensed by the National Association of State Directors of Teacher Education and Certification.

More

Teacher Education Student Learning Outcomes

Gallaudet University's teacher education student learning outcomes are based on the CEC and INTASC principles. These are the 12 standards Gallaudet graduates are expected to demonstrate.

(Video) Student Priti Ahuja on Early Childhood Education Master's Degree with Bilingual/ESL Specialization

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Job Outlook

High School Teacher

The employment for High School Teachers is expected to grow at a 4% rate from 2019 to 2029, with an average salary of $62,870. Learn more about a career as a high school teacher.

Education, Training, and Library Occupations

The employment of Education, Training, and Library Occupations are expected to grow by a 5% rate from 2019-2029, with an average annual salary of $52,380. Learn more about career opportunities in education, training, and library occupations.

Elementary and Middle School Teachers

The employment of Elementary and Middle School Teachers is expected to grow by a 12% rate from 2019-2029, with an average annual salary of $60,660. Learn more about career opportunities in teaching.

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Bobbie Kite

Associate Professor/UG Program Director

Overview
Requirements
Opportunities
Program Outcomes
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Faculty and Staff
FAQs
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(Video) Student Meg Fitzgerald on Child Development Master's Degree with Administration Specialization

FAQs

What can I do with BA Childhood Practice? ›

Graduates in Childhood Practice can register as lead professionals and managers in early learning and childcare to apply for promotion in their current workplace or can choose to train as a social worker, teacher or health promotion worker.

What is the BA in early childhood studies? ›

A BA in Early Childhood Studies can lead to a career in education, childhood development, children's charities, and many more. Graduates have found careers as teaching assistants, child development officers and more.

How long does a BA in Childhood Practice take? ›

Depending on entry level, which is based on credit awarded from previous qualifications: Part-time (structured): 2-6 years. Part-time (unstructured): 2-6 years.

What degree is best for early childhood education? ›

Associate Degree in Early Childhood Education

This 2-year degree qualifies you for many entry-level early childhood education jobs. It is the least costly degree to earn, and can often stand in for the first two years of a bachelor's degree program if you choose to pursue a full bachelor's degree.

What is the highest paying job in early childhood education? ›

Early Childhood Instructional Specialists

Instructional specialists have some of the highest paying jobs in early childhood education. These professionals are responsible for developing educational programs and curriculum for preschools and childcare centers.

What is the highest paying job in childcare? ›

High Paying Daycare Jobs
  • Early Childhood Director. Salary range: $39,000-$65,000 per year. ...
  • Nursery School Teacher. Salary range: $40,000-$54,000 per year. ...
  • Child Life Specialist. Salary range: $40,000-$51,500 per year. ...
  • Early Childhood Specialist. ...
  • Nursery Manager. ...
  • Child Development Specialist. ...
  • Day Care Director. ...
  • Nursery Technician.

Is childhood studies a good degree? ›

The degree allows you to develop the professional knowledge and skills to work with young children and their families on graduation. Employers are also interested in the broader skills you acquire, such as: written communication, developed through essays.

What is interesting about childhood studies? ›

Childhood studies also helps us to understand how children all develop at different rates. It's a combination of nature and nurture. Research into how children develop and learn shows us that learning is a social activity.

What level is BA Hons in Childhood Studies? ›

The BA (Hons) Early Childhood Studies (level 6 top up) is a one-year full-time or two-year part-time course. This course provides a progression for those who wish to 'top up' their Early Years Foundation Degree or equivalent foundation qualification to a full BA Honours degree.

What is the standard for childhood practice? ›

The Standard for Childhood Practice contains benchmarks and expected features. Benchmarks specify what is expected of a learner who has completed a programme in childhood practice and so meets the qualification requirement for registration as a manager/lead practitioner with the SSSC.

What qualifications do you need to be an early years practitioner Scotland? ›

You would need an NC in Early Education and Childcare (SCQF Level 6) or an HNC in Childhood Practice (SCQF Level 7), depending on your level of responsibility. The entry requirements for an HNC in Childhood Practice are two highers including English. You can also gain your qualification on the job.

How long is a Early Childhood Education diploma? ›

3- YEAR DIPLOMA IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION.

How do you become a preschool teacher? ›

The one-year certificate/ diploma course in Nursery Teacher Training (NTT) is the most preferred route to become a preschool teacher. In fact, several preschools also make ask for NTT Certification as a mandatory requirement. A Bachelor in Education (B. Ed) degree is also handy.

What type of degree is a bachelor's degree? ›

A bachelor's degree is the most common undergraduate degree awarded by universities and colleges in the US. Typically, a bachelor's degree takes four to five years to complete and consists of 120 to 130 semester credit hours.

Where do preschool teachers get paid the most? ›

Highest-Paid Preschool Teachers By State
RankStateAverage Preschool Teacher Salary
1Hawaii$43,575
2California$40,866
3New York$40,587
4New Mexico$38,878
46 more rows
2 Aug 2022

Is childcare a good career choice? ›

Childcare is an incredibly demanding but rewarding role! There are so many perks to working in childcare, such as teaching the future leaders of tomorrow, supporting children's social and intellectual development, as well as working within an environment that is supportive and shares the same passion as you!

What is early childhood field? ›

Early childhood education is focused on the critical developmental milestones, skills, and concepts that children attain during this period of their lives, from social-emotional skills to the beginnings of numeracy, literacy, and critical thinking.

What should I study if I like kids? ›

Good Degrees that Will Prepare You for a Career Working with Children
  • Bachelor's or master's in early childhood development.
  • Bachelor's or master's in education.
  • Bachelor's, master's, or doctorate in psychology.
  • Master's in counseling.
  • Master's in social work.
  • Master of library science.
18 Nov 2021

What can teachers do instead of teaching? ›

Teachers may add a psychology or counseling certification and become career counselors. Some teachers can even make more as education consultants. A career change out of teaching may just be diving deeper into the world of education.

How can I make money working with children? ›

High-paying Jobs Working with Children:
  1. Pediatric registered nurse. ...
  2. Pediatric dental hygienist. ...
  3. Child psychologist. ...
  4. Speech-language pathologist. ...
  5. Juvenile justice lawyer. ...
  6. Pediatric dentist. ...
  7. Pediatrician. ...
  8. Child psychiatrist.
2 Dec 2021

Why do I want to study early childhood education? ›

Early childhood education equips children with the skills and capacity to be effective and engaged learners through school and beyond. So, if you love working with children, delight in all things creative, and are eager to make a positive difference to the lives of others, then childcare could be for you.

What are 5 skills you need as an early childhood educator? ›

5 Essential Skills for an Early Childhood Educator
  • Patience. Children go through different stages of learning. ...
  • Communication. Young children aren't always good at expressing themselves or effectively communicating—that's why ECE teachers need to be excellent communicators. ...
  • Creativity. ...
  • Organization. ...
  • Enthusiasm.

What is the benefit of early childhood education? ›

Children who take part in early childhood education programs have improved social skills and do better in school. They also learn essential life skills that stay with them forever. Most importantly, preschool is a place where children have fun in a safe and loving environment.

Can you become a teaching assistant with Level 3 childcare? ›

What qualifications do you need to be a teaching assistant? You could get into this role via a college course such as a Level 3 Diploma or a T-level in Education and Childcare (England-only). You can also do an advanced apprenticeship, volunteering or applying directly.

What can I do with a level 5 in childcare? ›

Upon successful completion, you can work as an Early Years Senior Practitioner within the Early Years Workforce across the private, voluntary and independent sector or progress to Higher Education in a relevant subject area.

What can you do with a level 2 childcare qualification? ›

The completion of the Level 2 allows you to progress onto Level 3 Early Years Educator Childcare Diploma you have gained further experience.
...
Learners may work under supervision in a variety of roles such as:
  • Nursery practitioner.
  • Classroom assistant.
  • Pre-school practitioner.

What is the study of children called? ›

Paedology (paidology) is the study of children's behavior and development (as distinct from pedagogy, the art or science of teaching, and pediatrics, the field of medicine relating to children).

What are some child development questions? ›

What Would You Ask a Child Development Expert? Part Two
  • · Should I be concerned about my child's speech?
  • · How is my child developing?
  • · Is my child developing normally?
  • How is my child developing and is it normal?
  • What can I do if I am concerned?
19 Jan 2016

When did Childhood Studies start? ›

The modern development of the study of childhood in the past can reasonably be deemed to have started less than fifty years ago with Phillippe Ariès (1962) who was the first to give serious consideration to the nature of the lives of children in the past.

Can you be a teacher with an early years degree? ›

To be an Early Years Teacher you'll need to achieve Early Years Teacher Status (EYTS), which enables you to specialise in working with children up to five years old. To achieve EYTS you must meet the Early Years Teachers' Standards, which are government guidelines for the best professional practice in Early Years.

What qualifications do you need to be a nursery teacher UK? ›

You'll need to get early years teacher status (EYTS) and meet the teacher's standards by completing an early years initial teacher training course. There are several ways to do this: do an undergraduate degree in a subject related to early childhood studies or child development, along with course placements.

What level is early years professional status? ›

Early Years Professional Status (EYPS) is a Level 6 qualification that gives professional status for practitioners in England at the Early Years Foundation Stage (ages 0 – 5), which is intended to be broadly equivalent to Qualified Teacher Status (ages 5 – 18).

What is required for competent effective and safe practice in early years? ›

warm and loving, and foster a sense of belonging. sensitive and responsive to the child's needs, feelings and interests. supportive of the child's own efforts and independence. consistent in setting clear boundaries.

What is the Scottish Curriculum for Excellence? ›

Curriculum for Excellence is Scotland's curriculum for children and young people aged 3-18. It's an approach designed to provide young people with the knowledge, skills and attributes they need for learning, life and work in the 21st century. It aims to enable every child or young person to be a: Successful learner.

What does a child practitioner do? ›

A childcare practitioner is a childcare expert who specialises in working with and caring for children aged up to five years old. As a childcare practitioner, your primary role will be to safeguard and educate children within a registered early years setting.

What is the job role of an early years practitioner? ›

What does an early years practitioner do? An early years practitioner works closely with babies, toddlers or preschoolers, looking after their day-to-day needs like changing and feeding, and also organising age-appropriate activities to stimulate their physical, educational and emotional development.

What skills are needed for early learning and childcare? ›

Here are several important skills that child care workers commonly have:
  • Communication skills. ...
  • Planning and instruction. ...
  • Creative thinking. ...
  • Decision-making skills. ...
  • Problem-solving skills. ...
  • Analytical skills. ...
  • Compassion and empathy. ...
  • Organizational skills.

What degree is best for Early Childhood Education? ›

Associate Degree in Early Childhood Education

This 2-year degree qualifies you for many entry-level early childhood education jobs. It is the least costly degree to earn, and can often stand in for the first two years of a bachelor's degree program if you choose to pursue a full bachelor's degree.

What are 3 different careers you could have in Early Childhood Education? ›

What Can You Do With an Early Childhood Education Degree?
  • Preschool Teacher.
  • Kindergarten & Elementary School Teacher.
  • Nanny.
  • Childcare Center Director.
  • Childcare Worker.
  • Special Education Teacher.
  • School Counselor or Psychologist.

What can a early childhood diploma do? ›

The diploma fulfils the professional qualifications of a Level 2 category of teacher. You may teach any level from Pre-Nursery, Nursery to K1 and K2. You may also work in other roles in areas such as early intervention, special needs education, play therapy and teacher education.

What subjects are needed to become a preschool teacher? ›

By obtaining a bachelor's degree, you can broaden your employment options as a preschool teacher. Common topics covered in a bachelor's degree programme in early childhood education include behaviour assessment and management, math teaching methods, and reading instruction methods.

How do I prepare for a preschool teacher interview? ›

Five Questions Asked at Every Teaching Interview
  1. “Tell me about yourself.” ...
  2. “If I were to walk into your classroom during an early literacy or math activity, what would I see?” ...
  3. “How do you plan to communicate with families?” ...
  4. “What makes you the best candidate for this position?” (“Sell yourself!”)

Is a Bachelor's degree enough? ›

While a college degree still holds value among employers, many jobs that used to require a bachelor's degree now require a master's. In today's economy, this means most college students must spend more time preparing for their dream jobs. It also means generating as many marketable skills as possible along the way.

What does a BA degree stand for? ›

The BA (Bachelor of Arts) degree is the principal liberal arts degree.

Is a BA or BS better? ›

A BA and a BS serve different purposes. Neither degree ranks as better than the other, but one might better suit specific career goals. For example, students interested in technical careers may need a BS for graduate school applications. In some majors, undergrads choose between a BA and a BS.

What is HNC childhood practice? ›

The HNC Award in Childhood Practice at SCQF level 7 will equip candidates to work effectively in a range of care settings with a variety of service users. Learners will gain an understanding of the values and principles of social care and will learn how to integrate those values with the necessary skills and knowledge.

What is a PDA qualification in childcare? ›

The level 9 PDA develops the skills and knowledge required to manage services for children and young people. It is aimed at those who wish to progress into management within the Childcare and Playwork sectors without having to complete a full-time university programme.

What is a PDA Level 8? ›

The Professional Development Award (PDA) in Leadership at SCQF level 8 is designed to build and achieve competence in leadership and the development of operational plans. It is primarily aimed at managers who have gained some management experience and wish to consolidate and enhance their competence as leaders.

What qualifications do you need to be a nursery teacher UK? ›

You'll need to get early years teacher status (EYTS) and meet the teacher's standards by completing an early years initial teacher training course. There are several ways to do this: do an undergraduate degree in a subject related to early childhood studies or child development, along with course placements.

What qualifications do you need to work in a nursery? ›

Nursery assistants are likely to need a Level 2 Childcare qualification, whilst room leaders will need a Level 3. Some nurseries offer apprenticeship schemes. These allow you to study for a childcare qualification whilst working in an early years setting.

What do early years practitioners do? ›

What does an early years practitioner do? An early years practitioner works closely with babies, toddlers or preschoolers, looking after their day-to-day needs like changing and feeding, and also organising age-appropriate activities to stimulate their physical, educational and emotional development.

What level is a PDA? ›

PDAs are made up of Units and have specific aims that relate to occupational areas and are linked to National Occupational Standards. They sit on the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework (SCQF) at Levels 6 - 12.

What does CDA stand for in childcare? ›

The Child Development Associate (CDA) Credential™ is a widely recognized credential in early childhood education administered by the Council for Professional Development.

How many credits is a PDA? ›

It comprises 80 credits at SCQF level 8. The award is matched to the Revised Childhood Practice Standards and the National Occupational Standards.

What is a PDA Level 9 equivalent to? ›

The PDA Level 9 Childhood Practice is an industry-recognised qualification designed for lead practitioners and managers of childcare and playwork settings. This qualification is equivalent to a university degree and is accepted by the SSSC for registration as lead practitioner/manager.

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