Configure active-active S2S VPN connections - Azure VPN Gateway (2022)

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  • 14 minutes to read

This article walks you through the steps to create active-active cross-premises and VNet-to-VNet connections using the Resource Manager deployment model and PowerShell. You can also configure an active-active gateway in the Azure portal.

About highly available cross-premises connections

To achieve high availability for cross-premises and VNet-to-VNet connectivity, you should deploy multiple VPN gateways and establish multiple parallel connections between your networks and Azure. See Highly Available Cross-Premises and VNet-to-VNet Connectivity for an overview of connectivity options and topology.

This article provides the instructions to set up an active-active cross-premises VPN connection, and active-active connection between two virtual networks.

  • Part 1 - Create and configure your Azure VPN gateway in active-active mode
  • Part 2 - Establish active-active cross-premises connections
  • Part 3 - Establish active-active VNet-to-VNet connections

If you already have a VPN gateway, you can:

  • Update an existing VPN gateway from active-standby to active-active, or vice versa

You can combine these together to build a more complex, highly available network topology that meets your needs.

Important

The active-active mode is available for all SKUs except Basic.

Part 1 - Create and configure active-active VPN gateways

The following steps will configure your Azure VPN gateway in active-active modes. The key differences between the active-active and active-standby gateways:

  • You need to create two Gateway IP configurations with two public IP addresses
  • You need set the EnableActiveActiveFeature flag
  • The gateway SKU must be VpnGw1, VpnGw2, VpnGw3, or HighPerformance (legacy SKU).

The other properties are the same as the non-active-active gateways.

Before you begin

  • Verify that you have an Azure subscription. If you don't already have an Azure subscription, you can activate your MSDN subscriber benefits or sign up for a free account.
  • You'll need to install the Azure Resource Manager PowerShell cmdlets if you don't want to use Cloud Shell in your browser. See Overview of Azure PowerShell for more information about installing the PowerShell cmdlets.

Step 1 - Create and configure VNet1

1. Declare your variables

For this exercise, we'll start by declaring our variables. If you use the "Try It" Cloud Shell, you will automatically connect to your account. If you use PowerShell locally, use the following example to help you connect:

Connect-AzAccountSelect-AzSubscription -SubscriptionName $Sub1

The example below declares the variables using the values for this exercise. Be sure to replace the values with your own when configuring for production. You can use these variables if you are running through the steps to become familiar with this type of configuration. Modify the variables, and then copy and paste into your PowerShell console.

(Video) How to setup Site to Site (S2S) VPN from local OnPrem to Azure Cloud in 10 steps

$Sub1 = "Ross"$RG1 = "TestAARG1"$Location1 = "West US"$VNetName1 = "TestVNet1"$FESubName1 = "FrontEnd"$BESubName1 = "Backend"$GWSubName1 = "GatewaySubnet"$VNetPrefix11 = "10.11.0.0/16"$VNetPrefix12 = "10.12.0.0/16"$FESubPrefix1 = "10.11.0.0/24"$BESubPrefix1 = "10.12.0.0/24"$GWSubPrefix1 = "10.12.255.0/27"$VNet1ASN = 65010$DNS1 = "8.8.8.8"$GWName1 = "VNet1GW"$GW1IPName1 = "VNet1GWIP1"$GW1IPName2 = "VNet1GWIP2"$GW1IPconf1 = "gw1ipconf1"$GW1IPconf2 = "gw1ipconf2"$Connection12 = "VNet1toVNet2"$Connection151 = "VNet1toSite5_1"$Connection152 = "VNet1toSite5_2"

2. Create a new resource group

Use the example below to create a new resource group:

New-AzResourceGroup -Name $RG1 -Location $Location1

3. Create TestVNet1

The sample below creates a virtual network named TestVNet1 and three subnets, one called GatewaySubnet, one called FrontEnd, and one called Backend. When substituting values, it's important that you always name your gateway subnet specifically GatewaySubnet. If you name it something else, your gateway creation fails.

$fesub1 = New-AzVirtualNetworkSubnetConfig -Name $FESubName1 -AddressPrefix $FESubPrefix1$besub1 = New-AzVirtualNetworkSubnetConfig -Name $BESubName1 -AddressPrefix $BESubPrefix1$gwsub1 = New-AzVirtualNetworkSubnetConfig -Name $GWSubName1 -AddressPrefix $GWSubPrefix1New-AzVirtualNetwork -Name $VNetName1 -ResourceGroupName $RG1 -Location $Location1 -AddressPrefix $VNetPrefix11,$VNetPrefix12 -Subnet $fesub1,$besub1,$gwsub1

Step 2 - Create the VPN gateway for TestVNet1 with active-active mode

1. Create the public IP addresses and gateway IP configurations

Request two public IP addresses to be allocated to the gateway you will create for your VNet. You'll also define the subnet and IP configurations required.

$gw1pip1 = New-AzPublicIpAddress -Name $GW1IPName1 -ResourceGroupName $RG1 -Location $Location1 -AllocationMethod Dynamic$gw1pip2 = New-AzPublicIpAddress -Name $GW1IPName2 -ResourceGroupName $RG1 -Location $Location1 -AllocationMethod Dynamic$vnet1 = Get-AzVirtualNetwork -Name $VNetName1 -ResourceGroupName $RG1$subnet1 = Get-AzVirtualNetworkSubnetConfig -Name "GatewaySubnet" -VirtualNetwork $vnet1$gw1ipconf1 = New-AzVirtualNetworkGatewayIpConfig -Name $GW1IPconf1 -Subnet $subnet1 -PublicIpAddress $gw1pip1$gw1ipconf2 = New-AzVirtualNetworkGatewayIpConfig -Name $GW1IPconf2 -Subnet $subnet1 -PublicIpAddress $gw1pip2

2. Create the VPN gateway with active-active configuration

Create the virtual network gateway for TestVNet1. Note that there are two GatewayIpConfig entries, and the EnableActiveActiveFeature flag is set. Creating a gateway can take a while (45 minutes or more to complete, depending on the selected SKU).

New-AzVirtualNetworkGateway -Name $GWName1 -ResourceGroupName $RG1 -Location $Location1 -IpConfigurations $gw1ipconf1,$gw1ipconf2 -GatewayType Vpn -VpnType RouteBased -GatewaySku VpnGw1 -Asn $VNet1ASN -EnableActiveActiveFeature -Debug

3. Obtain the gateway public IP addresses and the BGP Peer IP address

Once the gateway is created, you will need to obtain the BGP Peer IP address on the Azure VPN Gateway. This address is needed to configure the Azure VPN Gateway as a BGP Peer for your on-premises VPN devices.

$gw1pip1 = Get-AzPublicIpAddress -Name $GW1IPName1 -ResourceGroupName $RG1$gw1pip2 = Get-AzPublicIpAddress -Name $GW1IPName2 -ResourceGroupName $RG1$vnet1gw = Get-AzVirtualNetworkGateway -Name $GWName1 -ResourceGroupName $RG1

Use the following cmdlets to show the two public IP addresses allocated for your VPN gateway, and their corresponding BGP Peer IP addresses for each gateway instance:

PS D:\> $gw1pip1.IpAddress40.112.190.5PS D:\> $gw1pip2.IpAddress138.91.156.129PS D:\> $vnet1gw.BgpSettingsText{ "Asn": 65010, "BgpPeeringAddress": "10.12.255.4,10.12.255.5", "PeerWeight": 0}

The order of the public IP addresses for the gateway instances and the corresponding BGP Peering Addresses are the same. In this example, the gateway VM with public IP of 40.112.190.5 will use 10.12.255.4 as its BGP Peering Address, and the gateway with 138.91.156.129 will use 10.12.255.5. This information is needed when you set up your on premises VPN devices connecting to the active-active gateway. The gateway is shown in the diagram below with all addresses:

Configure active-active S2S VPN connections - Azure VPN Gateway (1)

Once the gateway is created, you can use this gateway to establish active-active cross-premises or VNet-to-VNet connection. The following sections walk through the steps to complete the exercise.

Part 2 - Establish an active-active cross-premises connection

To establish a cross-premises connection, you need to create a Local Network Gateway to represent your on-premises VPN device, and a Connection to connect the Azure VPN gateway with the local network gateway. In this example, the Azure VPN gateway is in active-active mode. As a result, even though there is only one on-premises VPN device (local network gateway) and one connection resource, both Azure VPN gateway instances will establish S2S VPN tunnels with the on-premises device.

Before proceeding, please make sure you have completed Part 1 of this exercise.

Step 1 - Create and configure the local network gateway

1. Declare your variables

This exercise will continue to build the configuration shown in the diagram. Be sure to replace the values with the ones that you want to use for your configuration.

$RG5 = "TestAARG5"$Location5 = "West US"$LNGName51 = "Site5_1"$LNGPrefix51 = "10.52.255.253/32"$LNGIP51 = "131.107.72.22"$LNGASN5 = 65050$BGPPeerIP51 = "10.52.255.253"

A couple of things to note regarding the local network gateway parameters:

(Video) Azure Site-to-Site VPN quick setup

  • The local network gateway can be in the same or different location and resource group as the VPN gateway. This example shows them in different resource groups but in the same Azure location.
  • If there is only one on-premises VPN device as shown above, the active-active connection can work with or without BGP protocol. This example uses BGP for the cross-premises connection.
  • If BGP is enabled, the prefix you need to declare for the local network gateway is the host address of your BGP Peer IP address on your VPN device. In this case, it's a /32 prefix of "10.52.255.253/32".
  • As a reminder, you must use different BGP ASNs between your on-premises networks and Azure VNet. If they are the same, you need to change your VNet ASN if your on-premises VPN device already uses the ASN to peer with other BGP neighbors.

2. Create the local network gateway for Site5

Before you continue, please make sure you are still connected to Subscription 1. Create the resource group if it is not yet created.

New-AzResourceGroup -Name $RG5 -Location $Location5New-AzLocalNetworkGateway -Name $LNGName51 -ResourceGroupName $RG5 -Location $Location5 -GatewayIpAddress $LNGIP51 -AddressPrefix $LNGPrefix51 -Asn $LNGASN5 -BgpPeeringAddress $BGPPeerIP51

Step 2 - Connect the VNet gateway and local network gateway

1. Get the two gateways

$vnet1gw = Get-AzVirtualNetworkGateway -Name $GWName1 -ResourceGroupName $RG1$lng5gw1 = Get-AzLocalNetworkGateway -Name $LNGName51 -ResourceGroupName $RG5

2. Create the TestVNet1 to Site5 connection

In this step, you create the connection from TestVNet1 to Site5_1 with "EnableBGP" set to $True.

New-AzVirtualNetworkGatewayConnection -Name $Connection151 -ResourceGroupName $RG1 -VirtualNetworkGateway1 $vnet1gw -LocalNetworkGateway2 $lng5gw1 -Location $Location1 -ConnectionType IPsec -SharedKey 'AzureA1b2C3' -EnableBGP $True

3. VPN and BGP parameters for your on-premises VPN device

The example below lists the parameters you will enter into the BGP configuration section on your on-premises VPN device for this exercise:

- Site5 ASN : 65050- Site5 BGP IP : 10.52.255.253- Prefixes to announce : (for example) 10.51.0.0/16 and 10.52.0.0/16- Azure VNet ASN : 65010- Azure VNet BGP IP 1 : 10.12.255.4 for tunnel to 40.112.190.5- Azure VNet BGP IP 2 : 10.12.255.5 for tunnel to 138.91.156.129- Static routes : Destination 10.12.255.4/32, nexthop the VPN tunnel interface to 40.112.190.5 Destination 10.12.255.5/32, nexthop the VPN tunnel interface to 138.91.156.129- eBGP Multihop : Ensure the "multihop" option for eBGP is enabled on your device if needed

The connection should be established after a few minutes, and the BGP peering session will start once the IPsec connection is established. This example so far has configured only one on-premises VPN device, resulting in the diagram shown below:

Configure active-active S2S VPN connections - Azure VPN Gateway (2)

Step 3 - Connect two on-premises VPN devices to the active-active VPN gateway

If you have two VPN devices at the same on-premises network, you can achieve dual redundancy by connecting the Azure VPN gateway to the second VPN device.

1. Create the second local network gateway for Site5

The gateway IP address, address prefix, and BGP peering address for the second local network gateway must not overlap with the previous local network gateway for the same on-premises network.

$LNGName52 = "Site5_2"$LNGPrefix52 = "10.52.255.254/32"$LNGIP52 = "131.107.72.23"$BGPPeerIP52 = "10.52.255.254"
New-AzLocalNetworkGateway -Name $LNGName52 -ResourceGroupName $RG5 -Location $Location5 -GatewayIpAddress $LNGIP52 -AddressPrefix $LNGPrefix52 -Asn $LNGASN5 -BgpPeeringAddress $BGPPeerIP52

2. Connect the VNet gateway and the second local network gateway

Create the connection from TestVNet1 to Site5_2 with "EnableBGP" set to $True

$lng5gw2 = Get-AzLocalNetworkGateway -Name $LNGName52 -ResourceGroupName $RG5
New-AzVirtualNetworkGatewayConnection -Name $Connection152 -ResourceGroupName $RG1 -VirtualNetworkGateway1 $vnet1gw -LocalNetworkGateway2 $lng5gw2 -Location $Location1 -ConnectionType IPsec -SharedKey 'AzureA1b2C3' -EnableBGP $True

3. VPN and BGP parameters for your second on-premises VPN device

Similarly, below lists the parameters you will enter into the second VPN device:

- Site5 ASN : 65050- Site5 BGP IP : 10.52.255.254- Prefixes to announce : (for example) 10.51.0.0/16 and 10.52.0.0/16- Azure VNet ASN : 65010- Azure VNet BGP IP 1 : 10.12.255.4 for tunnel to 40.112.190.5- Azure VNet BGP IP 2 : 10.12.255.5 for tunnel to 138.91.156.129- Static routes : Destination 10.12.255.4/32, nexthop the VPN tunnel interface to 40.112.190.5 Destination 10.12.255.5/32, nexthop the VPN tunnel interface to 138.91.156.129- eBGP Multihop : Ensure the "multihop" option for eBGP is enabled on your device if needed

Once the connection (tunnels) are established, you will have dual redundant VPN devices and tunnels connecting your on-premises network and Azure:

Configure active-active S2S VPN connections - Azure VPN Gateway (3)

Part 3 - Establish an active-active VNet-to-VNet connection

This section creates an active-active VNet-to-VNet connection with BGP.

The instructions below continue from the previous steps listed above. You must complete Part 1 to create and configure TestVNet1 and the VPN Gateway with BGP.

(Video) Create an Azure Site-to-Site (S2S) VPN Connection

Step 1 - Create TestVNet2 and the VPN gateway

It is important to make sure that the IP address space of the new virtual network, TestVNet2, does not overlap with any of your VNet ranges.

In this example, the virtual networks belong to the same subscription. You can set up VNet-to-VNet connections between different subscriptions; please refer to Configure a VNet-to-VNet connection to learn more details. Make sure you add the "-EnableBgp $True" when creating the connections to enable BGP.

1. Declare your variables

Be sure to replace the values with the ones that you want to use for your configuration.

$RG2 = "TestAARG2"$Location2 = "East US"$VNetName2 = "TestVNet2"$FESubName2 = "FrontEnd"$BESubName2 = "Backend"$GWSubName2 = "GatewaySubnet"$VNetPrefix21 = "10.21.0.0/16"$VNetPrefix22 = "10.22.0.0/16"$FESubPrefix2 = "10.21.0.0/24"$BESubPrefix2 = "10.22.0.0/24"$GWSubPrefix2 = "10.22.255.0/27"$VNet2ASN = 65020$DNS2 = "8.8.8.8"$GWName2 = "VNet2GW"$GW2IPName1 = "VNet2GWIP1"$GW2IPconf1 = "gw2ipconf1"$GW2IPName2 = "VNet2GWIP2"$GW2IPconf2 = "gw2ipconf2"$Connection21 = "VNet2toVNet1"$Connection12 = "VNet1toVNet2"

2. Create TestVNet2 in the new resource group

New-AzResourceGroup -Name $RG2 -Location $Location2$fesub2 = New-AzVirtualNetworkSubnetConfig -Name $FESubName2 -AddressPrefix $FESubPrefix2$besub2 = New-AzVirtualNetworkSubnetConfig -Name $BESubName2 -AddressPrefix $BESubPrefix2$gwsub2 = New-AzVirtualNetworkSubnetConfig -Name $GWSubName2 -AddressPrefix $GWSubPrefix2New-AzVirtualNetwork -Name $VNetName2 -ResourceGroupName $RG2 -Location $Location2 -AddressPrefix $VNetPrefix21,$VNetPrefix22 -Subnet $fesub2,$besub2,$gwsub2

3. Create the active-active VPN gateway for TestVNet2

Request two public IP addresses to be allocated to the gateway you will create for your VNet. You'll also define the subnet and IP configurations required.

$gw2pip1 = New-AzPublicIpAddress -Name $GW2IPName1 -ResourceGroupName $RG2 -Location $Location2 -AllocationMethod Dynamic$gw2pip2 = New-AzPublicIpAddress -Name $GW2IPName2 -ResourceGroupName $RG2 -Location $Location2 -AllocationMethod Dynamic$vnet2 = Get-AzVirtualNetwork -Name $VNetName2 -ResourceGroupName $RG2$subnet2 = Get-AzVirtualNetworkSubnetConfig -Name "GatewaySubnet" -VirtualNetwork $vnet2$gw2ipconf1 = New-AzVirtualNetworkGatewayIpConfig -Name $GW2IPconf1 -Subnet $subnet2 -PublicIpAddress $gw2pip1$gw2ipconf2 = New-AzVirtualNetworkGatewayIpConfig -Name $GW2IPconf2 -Subnet $subnet2 -PublicIpAddress $gw2pip2

Create the VPN gateway with the AS number and the "EnableActiveActiveFeature" flag. Note that you must override the default ASN on your Azure VPN gateways. The ASNs for the connected VNets must be different to enable BGP and transit routing.

New-AzVirtualNetworkGateway -Name $GWName2 -ResourceGroupName $RG2 -Location $Location2 -IpConfigurations $gw2ipconf1,$gw2ipconf2 -GatewayType Vpn -VpnType RouteBased -GatewaySku VpnGw1 -Asn $VNet2ASN -EnableActiveActiveFeature

Step 2 - Connect the TestVNet1 and TestVNet2 gateways

In this example, both gateways are in the same subscription. You can complete this step in the same PowerShell session.

1. Get both gateways

Make sure you log in and connect to Subscription 1.

$vnet1gw = Get-AzVirtualNetworkGateway -Name $GWName1 -ResourceGroupName $RG1$vnet2gw = Get-AzVirtualNetworkGateway -Name $GWName2 -ResourceGroupName $RG2

2. Create both connections

In this step, you will create the connection from TestVNet1 to TestVNet2, and the connection from TestVNet2 to TestVNet1.

New-AzVirtualNetworkGatewayConnection -Name $Connection12 -ResourceGroupName $RG1 -VirtualNetworkGateway1 $vnet1gw -VirtualNetworkGateway2 $vnet2gw -Location $Location1 -ConnectionType Vnet2Vnet -SharedKey 'AzureA1b2C3' -EnableBgp $TrueNew-AzVirtualNetworkGatewayConnection -Name $Connection21 -ResourceGroupName $RG2 -VirtualNetworkGateway1 $vnet2gw -VirtualNetworkGateway2 $vnet1gw -Location $Location2 -ConnectionType Vnet2Vnet -SharedKey 'AzureA1b2C3' -EnableBgp $True

Important

Be sure to enable BGP for BOTH connections.

After completing these steps, the connection will be establish in a few minutes, and the BGP peering session will be up once the VNet-to-VNet connection is completed with dual redundancy:

Configure active-active S2S VPN connections - Azure VPN Gateway (4)

(Video) How to set up VPN connection between GCP HA and Azure Active-Active connection with BGP?

Update an existing VPN gateway

When you change an active-standby gateway to active-active, you create another public IP address, then add a second Gateway IP configuration. This section helps you change an existing Azure VPN gateway from active-standby to active-active mode, or vice versa using PowerShell. You can also change a gateway in the Azure portal on the Configuration page for your virtual network gateway.

Change an active-standby gateway to an active-active gateway

The following example converts an active-standby gateway into an active-active gateway.

1. Declare your variables

Replace the following parameters used for the examples with the settings that you require for your own configuration, then declare these variables.

$GWName = "TestVNetAA1GW"$VNetName = "TestVNetAA1"$RG = "TestVPNActiveActive01"$GWIPName2 = "gwpip2"$GWIPconf2 = "gw1ipconf2"

After declaring the variables, you can copy and paste this example to your PowerShell console.

$vnet = Get-AzVirtualNetwork -Name $VNetName -ResourceGroupName $RG$subnet = Get-AzVirtualNetworkSubnetConfig -Name 'GatewaySubnet' -VirtualNetwork $vnet$gw = Get-AzVirtualNetworkGateway -Name $GWName -ResourceGroupName $RG$location = $gw.Location

2. Create the public IP address, then add the second gateway IP configuration

$gwpip2 = New-AzPublicIpAddress -Name $GWIPName2 -ResourceGroupName $RG -Location $location -AllocationMethod DynamicAdd-AzVirtualNetworkGatewayIpConfig -VirtualNetworkGateway $gw -Name $GWIPconf2 -Subnet $subnet -PublicIpAddress $gwpip2

3. Enable active-active mode and update the gateway

In this step, you enable active-active mode and update the gateway. In the example, the VPN gateway is currently using a legacy Standard SKU. However, active-active does not support the Standard SKU. To resize the legacy SKU to one that is supported (in this case, HighPerformance), you simply specify the supported legacy SKU that you want to use.

  • You can't change a legacy SKU to one of the new SKUs using this step. You can only resize a legacy SKU to another supported legacy SKU. For example, you can't change the SKU from Standard to VpnGw1 (even though VpnGw1 is supported for active-active) because Standard is a legacy SKU and VpnGw1 is a current SKU. For more information about resizing and migrating SKUs, see Gateway SKUs.

  • If you want to resize a current SKU, for example VpnGw1 to VpnGw3, you can do so using this step because the SKUs are in the same SKU family. To do so, you would use the value: -GatewaySku VpnGw3

When you are using this in your environment, if you don't need to resize the gateway, you won't need to specify the -GatewaySku. Notice that in this step, you must set the gateway object in PowerShell to trigger the actual update. This update can take 30 to 45 minutes, even if you are not resizing your gateway.

Set-AzVirtualNetworkGateway -VirtualNetworkGateway $gw -EnableActiveActiveFeature -GatewaySku HighPerformance

Change an active-active gateway to an active-standby gateway

1. Declare your variables

Replace the following parameters used for the examples with the settings that you require for your own configuration, then declare these variables.

$GWName = "TestVNetAA1GW"$RG = "TestVPNActiveActive01"

After declaring the variables, get the name of the IP configuration you want to remove.

$gw = Get-AzVirtualNetworkGateway -Name $GWName -ResourceGroupName $RG$ipconfname = $gw.IpConfigurations[1].Name

2. Remove the gateway IP configuration and disable the active-active mode

Use this example to remove the gateway IP configuration and disable active-active mode. Notice that you must set the gateway object in PowerShell to trigger the actual update.

Remove-AzVirtualNetworkGatewayIpConfig -Name $ipconfname -VirtualNetworkGateway $gwSet-AzVirtualNetworkGateway -VirtualNetworkGateway $gw -DisableActiveActiveFeature

This update can take up to 30 to 45 minutes.

Next steps

Once your connection is complete, you can add virtual machines to your virtual networks. See Create a Virtual Machine for steps.

(Video) Azure: Connecting Networks with a Site-to-Site VPN

FAQs

What is active-active mode in Azure VPN gateway? ›

In the Active-active Azure VPN gateway configuration, you will need to configure your on-premises VPN device to accept or establish two S2S VPN tunnels to the two Azure VPN gateway public IP addresses which are created when active-active option is enabled and because the Azure gateway instances are in active-active ...

What do you need when setting up a Site-to-Site VPN Azure? ›

Prerequisites
  1. An Azure account with an active subscription. ...
  2. Make sure you have a compatible VPN device and someone who is able to configure it. ...
  3. Verify that you have an externally facing public IPv4 address for your VPN device.
Jun 14, 2022

Which of the following resources are required before you can deploy a VPN gateway between Azure and on-premises resources? ›

VPN gateway IP address: This is the public IP address of the VPN device for your on-premises network. The VPN device requires an IPv4 public IP address. Specify a valid public IP address for the VPN device to which you want to connect. It must be reachable by Azure.

How do I create a 2 Site VPN on Azure? ›

In this article
  1. Prerequisites.
  2. Create a VNet.
  3. Create the VPN gateway.
  4. Generate certificates.
  5. Add the VPN client address pool.
  6. Specify tunnel type and authentication type.
  7. Upload root certificate public key information.
  8. Install exported client certificate.
Aug 3, 2022

What is active active mode in virtual network gateway? ›

Virtual network gateway in Active/active mode establishes multiple parallel connections between your your on-premises VPN device and both instances of the gateway VMs.

What is Active Active mode? ›

In Active/Active mode, two or more servers aggregate the network traffic load, and working as a team, they distribute it to the network servers. The load balancers can also remember information requests from users and keep this information in cache.

How do I setup a VPN gateway? ›

Create Site-to-Site VPN
  1. 1) Log in to azure portal.
  2. 2) Go to More Services > Virtual network gateways.
  3. 3) Then click on the virtual network gateway you created and, under the settings tab, click on connection.
  4. 4) Then click on add.
  5. 5) In the wizard fill the relevant information and click ok.
Dec 11, 2016

What is S2S Azure? ›

A Site-to-Site (S2S) VPN gateway connection is a connection over IPsec/IKE (IKEv1 or IKEv2) VPN tunnel. S2S connections can be used for cross-premises and hybrid configurations. A S2S connection requires a VPN device located on-premises that has a public IP address assigned to it.

How do I connect my site-to-site VPN? ›

To set up a Site-to-Site VPN connection using a virtual private gateway, complete the following steps:
  1. Prerequisites.
  2. Step 1: Create a customer gateway.
  3. Step 2: Create a target gateway.
  4. Step 3: Configure routing.
  5. Step 4: Update your security group.
  6. Step 5: Create a Site-to-Site VPN connection.

Can I deploy two VPN gateways in same virtual network? ›

A VPN gateway is a specific type of virtual network gateway. Each virtual network can have only one VPN gateway. However, you can create multiple connections to the same VPN gateway.

What is the difference between point-to-site and site-to-site VPN in Azure? ›

Site-To-Site VPN: Site-to-site is used when you want to connect two networks and keep the communication up all the time. You will need to use your Firewall device to configure a Site-To-Site VPN. Point-To-Site VPN: It will create a secure connection to your Azure Virtual Network from an individual client computer.

Which two options can you use to connect Azure virtual networks to each other? ›

There are three ways that you can connect applications in two different Azure VNets: Route via the Internet. VNet peering. Site-to-site VPN.

What is a gateway VPN? ›

A VPN gateway is a type of networking device that connects two or more devices or networks together in a VPN infrastructure. It is designed to bridge the connection or communication between two or more remote sites, networks or devices and/or to connect multiple VPNs together.

Which two statements regarding an Azure VPN gateway are true? ›

Answer Description: The following statements are true: Azure allows you to deploy your own VPN gateways or servers in Azure, either from the Azure Marketplace or by creating your own VPN routers.

Which options are available when configuring an Azure application gateway? ›

Configuring an Azure Application Gateway
  • Put into a Virtual Network or Create one.
  • Public IP.
  • Choose Public IP or create existing one.
  • Set Idle Timeout to 5 min.
  • Listener – HTTP on Port 80.
  • Leave rest of settings as default.

What is Application Gateway in Azure? ›

Azure Application Gateway is a web traffic load balancer that enables you to manage traffic to your web applications. Traditional load balancers operate at the transport layer (OSI layer 4 - TCP and UDP) and route traffic based on source IP address and port, to a destination IP address and port.

What is difference between active-active and active passive? ›

Like the active-active cluster configuration, an active-passive cluster also consists of at least two nodes. However, as the name "active-passive" implies, not all nodes are going to be active. In the case of two nodes, for example, if the first node is already active, the second node must be passive or on standby.

What is an active-active application? ›

In an active-active application tier topology, two or more active server instances at distributed geographic locations are deployed to handle requests concurrently and thereby improve scalability and provide high availability.

How does active/active firewall work? ›

Here's why: the active firewall is the one responsible for actually moving the traffic for the users. The Standby gets to relax and just periodically check-in on the active to make sure he's okay. The Standby doesn't do anything except stand by until the Active goes belly-up or there's a problem.

How do I use Azure VPN gateway? ›

The following diagram shows the virtual network and the VPN gateway created as part of this tutorial.
  1. Prerequisites. An Azure account with an active subscription. ...
  2. Create a virtual network. ...
  3. Create a VPN gateway. ...
  4. View the public IP address. ...
  5. Resize a gateway SKU. ...
  6. Reset a gateway. ...
  7. Clean up resources. ...
  8. Next steps.
Jun 14, 2022

How do I make an Azure internet gateway? ›

Create NAT gateway existing public IP
  1. Sign in to the Azure portal.
  2. In the search box at the top of the portal, enter NAT gateway.
  3. In the search results, select NAT gateways.
  4. Select + Create.
  5. In Create network address translation (NAT) gateway, enter or select the following information.
May 10, 2022

What is a gateway subnet in Azure? ›

The gateway subnet is part of the virtual network IP address range that you specify when configuring your virtual network. It contains the IP addresses that the virtual network gateway resources and services use. The subnet must be named 'GatewaySubnet' in order for Azure to deploy the gateway resources.

What are the different types of VPN gateways? ›

Types of Virtual Private Network (VPN) Protocols:
  • Internet Protocol Security (IPSec): Internet Protocol Security, known as IPSec, is used to secure Internet communication across an IP network. ...
  • Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol (L2TP): ...
  • Point–to–Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP): ...
  • SSL and TLS: ...
  • OpenVPN: ...
  • Secure Shell (SSH):
Apr 10, 2019

What is the function of site to site VPN? ›

A site-to-site Virtual Private Network (VPN) provides this by creating an encrypted link between VPN gateways located at each of these sites. A site-to-site VPN tunnel encrypts traffic at one end and sends it to the other site over the public Internet where it is decrypted and routed on to its destination.

Who is connected to my Azure VPN? ›

In the Azure portal, go to your virtual network gateway. On the page for your virtual network gateway, click Connections. You can see the status of each connection. Click the name of the connection that you want to verify.

How do I find my VPN gateway IP address? ›

Create VPN gateway

In the search box at the top of the portal, enter Virtual network gateway. In the search results, select Virtual network gateways. Select + Create. In Create virtual network gateway, enter or select the following information.

How do I connect two websites over the Internet? ›

You can connect your sites and ensure security by creating a site-to-site Virtual Private Network (VPN), also called a gateway-to-gateway VPN. A VPN creates a secure tunnel between two sites via the Internet. For example, users at your branch offices can access file servers at the main office.

How do I connect two computers with a VPN? ›

How do I setup a VPN between two computers?
  1. Step 1 – Access the connection setup wizard on the client PC. Hit the Win (⊞) key on your keyboard. ...
  2. Step 2 – Configure the new VPN connection you're creating (outgoing) ...
  3. Step 3 – Establish the outgoing VPN connection. ...
  4. Step 4 – Finishing setup on the server PC (incoming)
Feb 15, 2021

What is the difference between VPN and ExpressRoute? ›

ExpressRoute provides direct connectivity to Azure cloud services and connects Microsoft's global network. All transferred data is not encrypted, and do not go over the public Internet. VPN Gateway provides secured connectivity to Azure cloud services over the public Internet.

What is the minimum number of NSGs you should create? ›

What is the minimum number of NSGs you should create? NSGs can be associated to subnets, individual VMs (classic), or individual network interfaces (NIC) attached to VMs (Resource Manager). You can associate zero, or one, NSG(s) to each VNet subnet and NIC in a virtual machine.

Can virtual networks span across multiple regions? ›

Yes. You can peer VNets across subscriptions and across regions.

Videos

1. AZ 700 Demo-ACTIVE-ACTIVE VNET TO VNET VPN GATEWAY SETUP Part 3
(Azure Cloud Network services)
2. AZ-700 Study Guide: Azure Network Engineer- VPN Gateways and Connection Types(S2S, P2S)
(Azure Cloud Network services)
3. Configure Azure Site-to-Site VPN Configuration Step by Step DEMO
(Paddy Maddy)
4. Azure - VPN Point To Site with Active Directory and Custom DNS setup | Step by Step Tutorial
(FreddyDubon)
5. Connect your on premises network to Azure with VPN Gateway
(Ed Goad)
6. Deploy virtual network gateway and configure a Site to Site VPN between azure and Palo Alto
(Cloud Guard)

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